Costa Rica, Mexico and Chile, the happiest countries in Latin America, according to the ranking of the UN

The World Report on Happiness held by the United Nations is led for the second year in a row by Finland. The least happy in Latin America is again Venezuela and Haiti.

The United Nations (UN) presented on Wednesday its World Report on Happiness, a ranking that in this edition is led by Finland for the second year in a row.
The United Nations (UN) presented on Wednesday its World Report on Happiness, a ranking that in this edition is led by Finland for the second year in a row.

Of the countries of Latin America, Costa Rica is the best valued, ranking 12th in a study of 156 countries in the world. They are followed by Mexico and Chile, occupying positions 23 and 26, respectively.

Chile, which improved one position in the 2019 edition, stands out as the happiest country in South America, ahead of Brazil (32), Uruguay (33), Colombia (43), Argentina (47); Ecuador (50); Bolivia (61); Paraguay (63); and Peru (65).

Venezuela was ranked 108th in the ranking, becoming the least happy country in South America, followed by Haiti (147) with the lowest rating in Latin America.

In Central America, Costa Rica and Mexico are schooled by Guatemala (27) and Panama (31). El Salvador and Nicaragua follow him in positions 35 and 45, respectively. Honduras is the least happy of that region with 59 points.

Worldwide, Finland repeats as the happiest country, followed by Denmark (2), Norway (3), Iceland (4) and the Netherlands (5).

The top ten complete it: Switzerland (6), Sweden (7), New Zealand (8), Canada (9) and Austria (10).

The United States, which started in the ranking in 11th place (in 2012) has dropped eight places in seven years to its current location in the nineteenth position.

The report that annually elaborates the United Nations, evaluates the quality of life of people through "a variety of measures of subjective well-being".

This year's study focuses on happiness and community: how happiness has evolved over the last twelve years, with a focus on technologies, social norms, conflicts and government policies that have driven those changes.

But it also takes into account other tangible variables such as levels of education, social support, the efficiency of governments, life expectancy or corruption.

This year's study focuses on happiness and community: how happiness has evolved over the last twelve years, with a focus on technologies, social norms, conflicts and government policies that have driven those changes.

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