Why marine species disappear faster than terrestrial ones?

A study revealed that it is easier for terrestrial species to find warmer or colder temperatures than for those living in the ocean.

The study, published in the journal Nature, is the first that is given to the task of comparing the sensitivity of aquatic and semi-aquatic species to climate change and their ability to stay in their own habitats.
The study, published in the journal Nature, is the first that is given to the task of comparing the sensitivity of aquatic and semi-aquatic species to climate change and their ability to stay in their own habitats.
Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

Until recently, environmentalists and scientists around the world had only one certainty; that the world's species were disappearing due to climate change. However, they had not been given the task of investigating which of these, as well as which ecosystems, were the most affected, very important information to guide the implementation of new conservation measures and avoid the loss of genetic diversity.

Therefore, researchers from the Rutgers, McGill, California, Stanford, and Oslo universities analyzed marine and terrestrial cold-blooded species and discovered that marine life is more sensitive to warming and less able to escape the heat.

Malin Pinsky, an academic from the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources of Rutgers University and leader of the project, affirmed that marine species are becoming extinct twice as often as terrestrial ones when the temperature increases.

"The findings suggest that further conservation efforts will be needed if the ocean will continue to support human well-being, nutrition, and economic activity."

For her part, Jennifer Sunday, co-author and assistant professor in McGill's Department of Biology, said it is easier to find warmer or colder temperatures for land animals like a lizard than ocean animals.

The analysis indicated that in the past, extinctions were often concentrated in specific latitudes and ecosystems when the climate changed rapidly and there was an increase in the likelihood that future warming would cause the loss of more marine species from local habitats and the greater rotation of species in the ocean.

The research analyzed 400 species from around the world, from lizards and fish to spiders, and safety conditions were calculated for 88 marine and 294 terrestrial species, as well as the coolest temperatures available for each species during the hottest parts of the world. year.

The study, published in the journal Nature, is the first that is given to the task of comparing the sensitivity of aquatic and semi-aquatic species to climate change and their ability to stay in their own habitats.

Experts believe that the identification of species and ecosystems most affected by climate change is essential to guide conservation and management. In this way, the loss of genetic diversity of species and ecosystems can be avoided, which will affect human society.

By Mexicanist with information from Nature.com

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