Why are bees important in the world?

Each species of the planet has a reason to exist, bees are no exception and the UN has dedicated one day of the year to raise awareness about its importance and preservation.

United Nations General Assembly declared May 20 World Bee Day to draw attention to the importance of preserving bees and other pollinators.
United Nations General Assembly declared May 20 World Bee Day to draw attention to the importance of preserving bees and other pollinators.
Image by Myriam Zilles from Pixabay

Bees are much more than a small insect with which humans share the planet, they are responsible for pollinating plants in plots near their hives, which contributes to improving biodiversity so that later, pollinators as birds, Butterflies and bats transport pollen from flower to flower to fertilize plants. This process allows the germination of seeds and the growth of fruits, that is, without bees, there would be no food.

Given the above, the United Nations General Assembly declared May 20 World Bee Day to draw attention to the importance of preserving bees and other pollinators. This date coincides with the birth of Anton Janša, a Slovenian apiculturist of the 18th century, pioneer of modern beekeeping.

Here are the 10 figures to highlight the importance of these insects, according to the UN and worldbeeday.org:

1. Bees pollinate up to 170,000 plant species.

2. A single bee can produce a teaspoon and a half of honey throughout its life.

3. To produce a kilogram of honey, a bee would have to visit 4 million flowers and fly 4 times the circumference of the Earth.

4. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), 75% of global food crops depend on pollination by insects and other animals.

5. It is estimated that between 235,000 and 577,000 million dollars of annual food production worldwide depends on the help of pollinators.

6. The queen in the hive is the only one who can lay eggs and is able to lay around 1,500 per day.

7. Of the 100 species of crops that provide 90% of the world's food, more than 70 are pollinated by bees.

8. Across Europe, bee populations and honey stocks have declined drastically since 2015, in some areas up to 30% per year due to extreme temperatures, floods, droughts and other phenomena resulting from climate change.

9. The vast majority of pollinator species are wild, including more than 20,000 species of bees.

10. A honeybee can fly up to 25 kilometers per hour, and this species is the only one that dies after it bites.

By Expansion

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