Uruguay and Mexico call a "neutral countries" conference on Venezuela

Uruguay and Mexico convened an international conference on "neutral countries" on February 7, following tensions generated after Juan Guaidó, leader of Parliament, proclaimed himself president in charge.

Venezuelan Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza insisted on establishing dialogues to seek solutions to the political crisis, including talks with the United States, a country with which Maduro broke relations.
Venezuelan Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza insisted on establishing dialogues to seek solutions to the political crisis, including talks with the United States, a country with which Maduro broke relations.

The city of Montevideo will host this conference with the aim of discussing a diplomatic solution to the crisis in Venezuela, in which representatives from more than 10 countries and international organizations will participate, according to a statement from the Uruguayan Foreign Ministry.

Mexico and Uruguay "have adopted a position of non-intervention, while at the same time they have expressed concern about the human rights situation in Venezuela, which is why they have decided to call for an inclusive and credible dialogue to solve once and for all the delicate situation that our Venezuelan brothers are going through, "said the official note.

Therefore, the idea is to gather in the Uruguayan capital representatives "of the main countries and international organizations that have shared this position in front of this situation". In the letter, it was added that the purpose of the conference is "to lay the foundations to establish a new dialogue mechanism that, with the inclusion of all Venezuelan forces, helps to restore stability and peace in that country."

According to the Foreign Ministry, this effort "responds to the call of the Secretary-General of the UN, António Guterres, to bet for dialogue in front of those who deny that this possibility exists". "The Government of Uruguay is ready to work with those members of the international community who, like Mexico and the UN, wish to bet on diplomacy," the statement said.

Guaidó, 35, announced on January 23 that he was awarded the powers of the Executive within the framework of what he called the fight against the "usurpation" of the Presidency by Nicolás Maduro, which he considers "illegitimate" after taking his second term on January 10. At least thirty countries, including Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, the United States, and Australia, have recognized Guaidó as interim president of Venezuela, while Bolivia and Cuba have shown their support for Maduro.

The Government of Uruguay, meanwhile, has avoided commenting on the legitimacy of Guaidó as interim Venezuelan leader, although he has not expressed his direct support for Maduro and in a joint statement with Mexico urged "Venezuelan society to find a peaceful solution and democratic in front of the complex panorama "of the country.

For his part, Venezuelan Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza insisted on establishing dialogues to seek solutions to the political crisis, including talks with the United States, a country with which Maduro broke relations. However, Guaidó has said he will not accept a "false" dialogue with the Chávez government or elections "that do not have the real conditions," two of the options put on the table to unlock the crisis in the country.