President of Globovisión will not testify in Spain because he is requested by Interpol

28/02/2020

Gorrín was summoned to testify as a person under investigation in the case that is investigating exalted "chavistas", officials and businessmen of that Latin American country for allegedly being part of a criminal organization for the looting of Petróleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) and other public companies and the subsequent laundering of those funds.

Raúl Gorrín is among the most wanted by the United States.
Raúl Gorrín is among the most wanted by the United States.

The president of the Venezuelan television channel Globovisión, Raul Gorrin, (who appears among the most wanted by the U.S.) has informed the judge of the National Court Maria Tardon that he will not go to testify this Wednesday, since he is under a search warrant from the U.S., a country to which he does not want to be handed over.

In a letter sent to the Central Court of Instruction number 3, Gorrín, who lives in Venezuela, said that despite this he wants to testify before Tardón and asked if it could be by video conference. According to legal sources consulted by Europa Press, the judge has now asked the parties in person to decide on the matter.

Gorrin was summoned to testify as a person under investigation in the case that investigates exalted "chavista" charges, officials and businessmen of this Latin American country for allegedly integrating a criminal organization for the looting of Petróleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) and other public companies and the subsequent laundering of these funds.

In fact, her summons was the first proceeding that the judge had carried out since she took on this case at the end of last year, which began by investigating the 41st Preliminary Investigation Court of Madrid.

According to the sources consulted, the president of the Venezuelan channel himself requested her presence in the case after the judge in Madrid issued an order in which he agreed to seize properties he owns in Spain.

Nine counts of money laundering in the U.S.

According to the U.S. Department of Justice, Gorrín, 51, is charged with nine counts of laundering for allegedly paying millions of dollars in bribes to two senior Venezuelan officials, including national treasurer Alejandro Andrade, to conduct foreign exchange transactions at rates favorable to the Venezuelan regime.

In addition to transferring money for those officials, Gorrín allegedly paid expenses related to private planes, yachts, houses, horses, high-end watches and a fashion line. To hide the bribe payments, the U.S. Justice Department adds, he made payments through multiple shell companies.

The case now in the hands of Judge Tardón stems from a complaint filed more than two years ago with the Anti-Corruption Prosecutor's Office and is investigating alleged crimes of bribery of Venezuelan officials, malfeasance, corruption in international economic transactions, unfair administration, fraud and crimes against the Treasury.

Two former ministers indicted

The benefits of the alleged fraud would be partly visible in Spain, where several of the defendants also reside. So far, the investigation has involved more than twenty people, including two former Venezuelan ministers, Energy Nervis Villalobos and Electrical Development Javier Alvarado Ochoa, and former PDVSA security chief Rafael Reiter.

The judge also cited this Wednesday the investigated José Roberto Rincón Bravo for the appointment of a judicial administrator of La Losilla, a farm located in the Madrid municipality of Villarejo de Salvanés that was blocked by the judge after his arrest in 2018.

According to the investigations, the assets that Rincón Bravo's family - his father was a director of PDVSA and is being held in the United States - possess in Spain originated from irregularities committed in the Venezuelan state oil company, so his accounts were blocked by a court order.

Finally, the judge has also summoned as a witness Ceciree Carolina Casanova, former manager of Human Resources of Electricidad de Caracas (ECD), and owner of companies that share a registered office with companies of the accused former vice-minister Javier Alvarado Ochoa.

By Mexicanist