Study confirms growth and relevance of organic agriculture in the world

Research, done in Brazil, reaffirms that organic agriculture production mode conserves and increases environmental biodiversity.

According to the Brazilian research institute, organic agriculture produces food, fiber, and energy through a mode of production that preserves and increases environmental biodiversity.
According to the Brazilian research institute, organic agriculture produces food, fiber, and energy through a mode of production that preserves and increases environmental biodiversity.

The Brazilian Agricultural Research Company (EMBRAPA), a Brazilian public federal state institution linked to the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supply of Brazil, edited and disseminated a technical paper on "Organic Agriculture not Brazil: a study on or National Cadastro de Organic Producers" in which it characterizes organic production and provides data on the global economic magnitude of this production methodology.

In this document, Embrapa reports that one of the determining factors for the importance of organic agriculture is its ability to conserve and promote ecosystem services, such as biological control, pollination, soil conservation, and nutrient cycling.

According to the Brazilian research institute, organic agriculture produces food, fiber, and energy through a mode of production that preserves and increases environmental biodiversity. By using biological methods of pest and disease control as a priority, it offers less risk of contamination and environmental contamination, in addition to reducing risks to human health.

Regarding the relationship between organic production and Rural Development, EMBRAPA affirms that organic agriculture can become a means of socio-economic promotion of farmers since it implies the construction of new social marketing networks and the reach of new markets. These new markets offer a greater economic return to the producer and provide opportunities to increase their quality of life and autonomy in the use of external inputs.

The systemic approach of organic agriculture and the application of ecological principles as a knowledge base for the achievement of the sustainability of agricultural systems make organic agriculture an ally in the achievement of the goals of the 2030 Agenda presented at the meeting of the Sustainable Development Summit at the United Nations Conference in 2015, and signed by all member countries.

The 2030 Agenda establishes the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), whose goals include the promotion of sustainable agricultural production systems, the promotion of people's health and environmental balance, guaranteeing biodiversity and the efficient use of natural resources, and those proposals are inherent to the mode of production of organic agriculture.

According to EMBRAPA, the products originating from organic agriculture are considered differentiated in quality and receive an organic seal, which is a seal of quality, which indicates that the product has been cultivated and processed within the internationally established standards or for each one.

The organic agriculture market in the world

The Research Institute of Organic Agriculture is an independent, non-profit European institution whose objective is the advancement of science in the field of organic agriculture. This Institute has offices and collaborators in all the continents and publishes a statistical yearbook with data on European and world organic agriculture.

The organic production data of the 2018 global yearbook, which contains information from 178 countries, show that the sector occupies 57.8 million hectares, which correspond to 1.2% of the world's producing areas, and represents 2.7 million of organic producers. This universe corresponded to a market of 89,700 million dollars in 2016, led by the United States (43,100 million dollars), Germany (10,500 million dollars) France (7,500 million dollars).

In relation to 2015, there was a global increase of 15% in areas and of 12.8% in the number of producers. Currently, 87 countries have national regulations for organic production and another eight are in the process of being prepared.

The value of global agricultural production reached $ 4.3 trillion in 2016, and organic agriculture accounted for 2.1% of that market (FAO, 2018). The production of food in the conventional system by large enterprises and large-scale monoculture feeds 30% of the world population and uses 70% to 80% of the arable land, 70% of the water and 80% of the fossil fuels used in the agriculture.

Source: Republica.com.uy

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