Monuments of Mexico in digital by Google Open Heritage

The Cathedral of Mexico City will be part of the 30 new locations from 13 countries, including the Temple of Apollo, in Greece; the Tomb of Tu Duc, in Vietnam; and the Monument to Thomas Jefferson, in the United States, among several others, that can be traveled virtually thanks to Google's Arts and Culture project, developed in collaboration with the non-profit organization called CyArk.

The Cathedral of Mexico City will be part of the 30 new locations from 13 countries, that can be traveled virtually thanks to Google's Arts and Culture project
The Cathedral of Mexico City will be part of the 30 new locations from 13 countries, that can be traveled virtually thanks to Google's Arts and Culture project

It is this Thursday, April 18, coinciding with the World Heritage Day, that Google Arts and Culture will expand its Open Heritage project by adding a new set of endangered sites around the world. to the platform, which includes works such as the Palacio de Bellas Artes and the archaeological ruins of Monte Albán.

The formation of a new Open Heritage Alliance and the Open Heritage 3D portal is announced, which will bring together experts in preservation of government institutions, the academic world, and Google Arts & Culture to work together on the project that seeks to preserve the world heritage.

So far, the Open Heritage project, announced last September, provides virtual access to 27 world heritage sites in 18 different countries, with data and information on each location, as well as presenting 3D models of 3D structures and laser scanning technology.

The sites include Chichén Itzá, in Mexico; Al Azem Palace, in Syria; and the Brandenburg Gate, in Germany. The Open Heritage project represents a completely new way of displaying and interacting with the largest 3D heritage data archive in the world.

In addition, Google Arts & Culture used the collected data to create a virtual experience in the ancient city of Bagan, in Myanmar.

AGAINST DISASTERS

Recent fires, such as the Notre Dame cathedral in Paris and the National Museum of Brazil destroyed part of the cultural heritage of humanity, ending with irreplaceable pieces of our history.

Such recent disasters show the constant risk due to earthquakes, floods or other natural disasters and are exposed to the destruction caused by wars or damages caused by tourism and the growth of cities.

Today, thanks to Google Arts & Culture, which started working with the National Museum of Brazil in 2017, they can be seen through Street View images and online exhibitions can be entered virtually and part of the 20 million can be seen. destroyed artifacts, including the oldest skeleton discovered in America.

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