Mexico, more corrupt than Venezuela, according to study

Mexico is more corrupt than Venezuela, has a lower level of access to justice than Nicaragua and is also more insecure than Honduras, according to the 2019 State of Law Index prepared worldwide by the World Justice Project (WJP).

In Absence of Corruption, Mexico occupied position 117 out of 126 and was rated with 0.29 points, even less than Venezuela which obtained a score of 0.32. In the case of Order and Security, Mexico was evaluated with 0.57 to be below Honduras.
In Absence of Corruption, Mexico occupied position 117 out of 126 and was rated with 0.29 points, even less than Venezuela which obtained a score of 0.32. In the case of Order and Security, Mexico was evaluated with 0.57 to be below Honduras.

This study, in which Mexico occupies the 99th position of 126 countries, measures the level of Rule of Law of each nation based on the perception of its citizens; to do so, 120 thousand surveys are applied to people in general and 3 thousand 800 to experts in the field.

The rating of each country goes from 0 to 1, where 1 represents a greater attachment to the Rule of Law. In this sense, Mexico had a global evaluation of 0.45, falling below countries such as Sierra Leone, the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, El Salvador or Vietnam.

The level of Rule of Law is measured based on the opinion of citizens and specialists regarding eight issues: limits to governmental power, an absence of corruption, open government, fundamental rights, order and security, regulatory compliance, civil justice, and criminal justice.

Also, all these items contain a particular rating. In this sense, Mexico obtained its worst evaluation in Absence of Corruption, Order and Security, and Criminal Justice. On the contrary, the area where the rating was more positive was in Open Government.

In Absence of Corruption, Mexico occupied position 117 out of 126 and was rated with 0.29 points, even less than Venezuela which obtained a score of 0.32. In the case of Order and Security, Mexico was evaluated with 0.57 to be below Honduras.

Another area where Mexico was poorly evaluated was in Criminal Justice, as it was ranked 115 with an evaluation of 0.29, so it fell short of nations like Nicaragua.

Regarding the rest of the factors, Mexico obtained its best rating in Open Government with an evaluation of 0.61 to settle in position 35. In Limits to Government Power our country remained with the position 84; in Fundamental Rights, the 73; in Regulatory Compliance, the 87, and in Civil Justice the 113.

The Rule of Law Index 2019 also divides the 126 countries by region. In this case, Mexico is in the 26th position of 30 in the Latin American and Caribbean group, which is below those of Guatemala, Suriname, Ecuador and the Dominican Republic.

In the Latin American and Caribbean region, the first position was held by Uruguay with a score of 0.71, while the last place was left by Venezuela with 0.28.

At a global level, Denmark was the country with the best position at 0.90; Norway, with 0.89; Finland, with 0.87; Sweden, with 0.85, and The Netherlands with 0.84.

About the study, Leslie Solís, a researcher at the WJP, considered that "it can help detect the strengths and weaknesses to take actions based on evidence."

For his part, Jorge Antonio Morales, of the same association, called for "society to adopt this study to promote discussions. Make it a tool to propose public policy. We would love for the government and civil society to add this study to their indicators."

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