The history of color in Mexican design, fashion, and architecture

The Object Museum opens a sample of more than a thousand pieces that illustrate the influence of this element in the design, fashion, and architecture

The Object Museum opens a sample of more than a thousand pieces that illustrate the influence of this element in the design, fashion, and architecture
The Object Museum opens a sample of more than a thousand pieces that illustrate the influence of this element in the design, fashion, and architecture

In its most recent exhibition, the Object Object Museum (MODO) undertakes a trip to various stages of the past through the history of color in Mexico, which allows knowing how it has impacted disciplines such as design, fashion, popular art, applied arts, marketing and architecture. Curated by Ana Elena Mallet and Mariano Marroquín, México a Color presents 1,347 objects from the MODO collection, whose collection amounts to more than 140 thousand from 1810 to date. 

Through its eight thematic nuclei, the exhibition uses a broad chromatic palette, which can be seen from popular art and the way in which the regime's policy, after the Mexican Revolution, laid the foundations for intellectuals and artists they will consolidate a nationalist aesthetic where color was fundamental, explained Ana Elena Mallet.

The color is present the same in works of art of creators like Diego Rivera or Dr. Atl, that in accessories, packaging, posters, embases, trays, toothpaste and, of course, in buildings and houses. At a press conference, Paulina Newman, director of MODO, said that for the first time the objects of her collection coexist, "with the only requirement that they share the color. We can see how color has been part of Mexico in all aspects, from architecture, design, popular arts, fashion, and painting. With this, we can corroborate that color has been an important part of Mexico."

"Since 1921, when this great exhibition of popular arts is made, whose pieces are exhibited, from then until now this identity has been forged and we nurture it with more elements that speak of the transcendence of color in our country."

The exhibition aims to be a kind of cultural review of the perception of color in Mexico and its consequences in areas such as arts and design, said Newman. Héctor Escamilla, director of the ColorLife Program of Comex, which participates in this exhibition, explained that within its extensive catalog already has the "chilango rose". It is about the pink that is observed in the canvases of the stalls in the tianguis, in the taxis and even in several businesses.

As a complement, in collaboration with Comex, México a Color brings together eight pieces created by renowned designers and artists to accompany the exhibition. The exhibition will remain open at MODO, Colima 145, Colonia Roma, until July 28, 2019.

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