Dali Lives, a virtual reality experience based on artificial intelligence

From May 11, the day when the surrealist artist Dalí (1904-1989) would turn 115, the Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, which has more than 2,000 works, from oil paintings, drawings and watercolors to engravings, photographs, sculptures, documents, books, and artistic objects, will have an additional attraction - Dali Lives, a virtual reality experience based on artificial intelligence.

The project Dali Lives began with a massive collection of Dalí interview images that served to make an artificial intelligence algorithm "learn" all aspects of the face and facial expression of the artist.
The project Dali Lives began with a massive collection of Dalí interview images that served to make an artificial intelligence algorithm "learn" all aspects of the face and facial expression of the artist.

Dali Lives, is a virtual reality experience based on artificial intelligence that allows you to interact with a Dalí who looks like when he was about 50 years old and speaks English with a marked accent in which a shocking Mexican note is noticed.

"I do not believe in my death, and you?", asks Dalí from one of the screens installed in the museum for this unique experience.

"My generation is used to seeing art in two dimensions, but young audiences need to interact digitally with art," says the director of the Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, the Californian Hank Hine. The institution that Hine runs is an example of how museums can change to fit the times.

"You have to redefine the experience of visiting a museum," says Hine, who warns that not everything is limited to using new technologies. Some "mental flexibility" is also necessary.

The foundation of the Museum of St. Petersburg is the valuable collection of "dalís" treasured by businessman and philanthropist Albert Reynolds Morse and his wife Eleanor Morse, who in addition to large buyers of his works were friends of the Spanish artist and his muse, Gala, from the 40s of the twentieth century.

Decades later, the Morse sought a permanent home for their collection and that is how it ended up in St. Petersburg, which made the best offer and today receives thousands of tourists a year attracted by an artistic treasure that makes it unique among the cities of the west coast of Florida.

The museum, which opened its doors in 1982 in a different location to the current one and receives some 40,000 visitors a year, wants to expand in order to organize more "experiences" like Dali Lives.

The project Dali Lives began with a massive collection of Dalí interview images that served to make an artificial intelligence algorithm "learn" all aspects of the face and facial expression of the artist.

Recommended stories