In Mexico, 14% of jobs could disappear by automation

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) estimated that 14 percent of existing jobs could disappear in the next 15 to 20 years as a result of automation, a percentage that in Mexico would be a little higher. Another 32 percent is also likely to radically change as individual tasks are automated.

Training for adults should focus on the workers who face the greatest disadvantages, such as adults, and this should be imparted by the level of skill, employment status, and automation risk.
Training for adults should focus on the workers who face the greatest disadvantages, such as adults, and this should be imparted by the level of skill, employment status, and automation risk.
Image by Martinelle from Pixabay

In the case of Mexico, the jobs that will be lost due to automation will be a little over 14 percent, given the manufacturing and economic structure they have, but it was reserved to specify an exact number since the country did not participate in the survey.

One of the first challenges facing Mexico in labor matters is automation, for which it must ensure that it will have learning, training, social security, and unionization systems so that workers displaced by technological changes can change for others. jobs.

The displacement of workers by technology can be better anticipated and addressed if there are unions and employers' organizations that speak to each other and face the same challenges together and know how to anticipate and prepare to do something together.

The second problem of Mexico in labor matters is informality, which reaches 57 percent of workers since the challenge in the future of work is to have security coverage, which by definition can not occur among people employed in the workplace. informal sector.

Populations are aging rapidly in the country since the population over 65 went from representing 20 percent in 1980, to 28 percent in 2015 and is estimated to reach 53 percent by 2050.

Many people do not have the right skills for new jobs, as six out of 10 adults lack digital skills or have no computer experience. Training for adults should focus on the workers who face the greatest disadvantages, such as adults, and this should be imparted by the level of skill, employment status, and automation risk.

There is a need to adopt social protection to the future of work because non-standard workers are 50 percent less likely to belong to a union and in some countries, they are 40 and 50 percent less likely to receive financial support when they are unemployed.

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