Aeromar reconsiders the Mayan Route

The airline plans to reactivate the routes it suspended last year, waiting for oil activity in Veracruz and Tabasco to detonate business tourism

Almost eight months after having suspended the route, Aeromar considers operating it again. Photo: Aeromar website
Almost eight months after having suspended the route, Aeromar considers operating it again. Photo: Aeromar website

The projects of the Dos Bocas refinery, in Tabasco, and the Mayan Train that will cross five southeastern states, will be key for Aeromar to re-launch the Mayan Route, which it suspended in mid-2018 due to lack of demand.

Danilo Correa, CEO of the airline, confirmed to El Sol de Mexico that the plans announced by the federal government for the southeast have revived interest in increasing its flights in the region.

"Yes, we are already analyzing it. It is a project that we do not remove from the line. It is an issue that we have left pending and when the company is more prepared it will be able to operate profitably and correctly, "said the manager.

In 2016, the airline presented its Mayan World routes, with a series of flights to and from five entities in southeastern Mexico, taking advantage of the great diversity of tourist attractions in that region.

The objective was to attract European travelers to Oaxaca, Chiapas, Tabasco, Yucatan and Quintana Roo.

Last year, the company announced the cancellation of the project to focus its efforts and consolidate its presence in the markets it operates with the most success, reducing its network of destinations from 26 to 19.

Almost eight months after having suspended the route, Aeromar considers operating it again, although not in the short term.

The airline is particularly attracted to the impact generated by the construction of the refinery in terms of business tourism. "We are more interested in the oil issue, in how Veracruz and Tabasco entail many opportunities for Aeromar, especially for the regional fleet we have."

Aeromar is in a process of "reinvention" that considers the purchase of six aircraft a year in the next five years to expand its routes and frequencies. As part of this restructuring could resume flights in the southeast circuit.

"I had a route profitability meeting and we are seeing all the profiles of the new operations that we could have," Correa said.

He said that the flights would be operated both with the ATR aircraft owned by the company and with some jets that they intend to acquire. "There are areas of the country that we have clear and that will be important, as part of the investments that grow in various regions," he concluded.

In recent years, the growth of flights to the southeast has grown moderately, only 4 percent in the network of nine terminals operated by Grupo Aeroportuario del Sureste (Asur).

The data from the Directorate General of Civil Aeronautics (DGAC) indicate that the only terminals of this network with growth were the ones in Cancun, which increased its flights by 5 percent; Merida, 15.5 percent; and Veracruz, with 10.3 percent.

Of the four terminals operated by the Airports and Auxiliary Services (ASA) network in the region, only that of Ciudad del Carmen and Puerto Escondido recorded growth in operations.