7 out of 10 Mexicans back neutral stance on Venezuela

A REFORMA survey revealed that Mexicans support not intervening in the Venezuelan crisis.

The Venezuelan opposition, led by self-proclaimed interim president Juan Guaidó, will march on Saturday in support of the European ultimatum given to President Nicolás Maduro to accept "free elections", just when the ruling party will celebrate 20 years of Chavez government. (Photo: AFP)
The Venezuelan opposition, led by self-proclaimed interim president Juan Guaidó, will march on Saturday in support of the European ultimatum given to President Nicolás Maduro to accept "free elections", just when the ruling party will celebrate 20 years of Chavez government. (Photo: AFP)

Sixty-eight percent of the population prefers that Mexico does not intervene in international conflicts and 7 out of 10 Mexicans believe that the government should maintain a neutral stance on the situation in Venezuela, a poll by the newspaper Reforma reported Friday.

Through interviewing 451 adults between January 30 and 31, Reforma recorded that 63 percent of Mexicans are in favor of the Mexican government not intervening in the conflict, and 30 percent said they were against it.

While 68 percent believe that the government should not intervene in international conflicts, and 27 percent indicated that the country should be active in world affairs.

In addition, 51 percent indicated that it must be more important for Mexico to defend human rights even though it intervenes in conflicts in other countries, and 44 percent explained that it must respect the sovereignty of other countries even if human rights are violated.

82 percent consider that Venezuela is governed by a dictatorship, and 73 percent have an unfavorable opinion of Nicolás Maduro. The survey adds that 47 percent of Mexicans believe the conflict in that country will be resolved in a violent manner, and 43 percent believe it will be peaceful.

In the case of Mexico, the government of Andrés Manuel López Obrador stayed on the sidelines and did not publicly demonstrate their rejection or support for Guaidó, however, together with Uruguay, he invited Maduro to initiate a dialogue to try to calm the political situation of the country, which was accepted by the Venezuelan president: "I am willing to dialogue ... I am in agreement and ready with a diplomatic initiative for dialogue, understanding, and agreement," he said.

Last Monday, January 28, Venezuelan Foreign Minister, Jorge Arreaza, informed that the Delegates of the governments of Mexico and Uruguay will deliver to the Secretary-General of the UN, Antonio Guterres, his proposals for dialogue to try to resolve the serious political crisis by which it crosses Venezuela.